justmysillydoodles:

ivorylungs:

sherlock saying that very soft and subtle thank you he did while he was drunk and john said he was funny but this time he’s thanking john for loving him and john tearing up over it and holding him so hard and not saying anything and sherlock is so confused over john crying and john is so very sad for sherlock and doesn’t want to let go of him ever again

image

image

image

image

image

image

I’ll just leave this here…

Mark Gatiss and Martin Freeman, at the Olivier Awards — April 13, 2014

(Source: m-gatiss)

the-diogenes:

*dramatic end credit music*

Will our hero stick to his diet? And just how much paperwork does it take to rig a Korean election?

Find out in two years.

watsonsdick:

AU - Parentlock

Post Reichenbach

"Who do you love the most?"

Mads Mikkelsen as Sebastian Moran

her ring is on your finger (but my heart is in your hands)

ao3feed-johnlock:

read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/1p2GdPl

by

"You ran into a fire to save me,” he says, eyes closed. “You killed Magnussen to protect me.” He takes a shaky breath. “You faked your own death to keep me safe.”

Sherlock closes his eyes, too. “Yes,” he says, softly. He can feel John’s breath against his mouth.

"You love me," John says, simply, just as certain, and the words hang between them for a long moment.

"Yes," he repeats, helplessly, and John’s fingertips dig into the back of his neck almost painfully

(3x03 alternate ending).

Words: 1259, Chapters: 1/1, Language: English



read it on the AO3 at http://ift.tt/1p2GdPl

smaug-thefabulous:

YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND HOW MUCH I LOVE THAT SECOND GIF

HE’S JUST SO CONFUSED LIKE ‘WHAT THE HELL WHY WOULD SOMEONE WRITE THAT’ IT’S AMAZING, CUTIE WITH HIS BLINKING

(Source: mishasteaparty)

strangeparticles:

'This is our Yorick. He was a Polish composer and pianist called André Tchaikowsky. And when he died, in the early eighties, he bequeathed his head to be used in a production of Hamlet with the Royal Shakepeare Company. He wanted to play Yorick. So here he is. This is André. He was introduced to us by our director Greg on the first day of rehearsals, as the final member of the company. There was a variety of reactions to having a real human head in the production. Some people find it quite difficult. I must say, personally, I was rather excited by it. It's one of the clichés of the play now, an actor holding a skull. And I suppose the trouble with the cliché is that it loses meaning. But if you are presented with an actual person's skull, a real bit of human, then Hamlet's speech about Yorick and about staring at the skull of a man he knew well… it becomes all the more potent when you are aware that you are holding somebody's head quite literally in your hands. There he is. André was there. I feel very pleased to have helped him fulfil his ambition.'

—David Tennant, Shakespeare Uncovered